1143 Westchester Way, Cincinnati OH 45244

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Welcome home!This Stunning Polo Fields brick 2 story with 4BR &2.5 BA. Home features an open floor plan. Beautiful kitchen with granite counters and Cherry Oak Cabinets.Living room with huge windows for natural light with a cozy fireplace.Huge master suite and master bath with his and her sink, tub and shower.Covered front porch and stamped concrete rear patio.Unfinished lower level with rough in for a full bath.Well maintained home on a quiet street with great neighbors.

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12079 Marwood Ln,Cincinnati, OH 45246

12079 Marwood Ln,

Cincinnati, OH 45246

3 beds 2 baths 1,364 sqft

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Nice 3 bedroom ranch on corner lot. One car garage, fenced yard, Enjoy the sunset from the covered patio.  Close to schools and so much more!!!

OPEN HOUSE

  • 8/21 1pm-3pm

FACTS

  • Baths: 1 full, 1 half
  • Lot: 0.26 acres
  • Single Family
  • Built in 1960
  • 59 days on Zillow
  • Views since listing: 2,217
  • All time views: 2,484
  • 20 shoppers saved this home
  • Cooling: Central
  • Price/sqft: $77
  • MLS #: 1497968

FEATURES

  • Finished basement
  • Parking: Garage – Attached, 1 space, 336 sqft garag

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Calculating Your Closing Costs!

Your Closing Costs—Worksheet for Calculation

Estimated Purchase Price……………………………………………………………………………………..

Costs Related to Purchase of Home

Homeowners’ title insurance……………………………………….

Flood certificate, if applicable……………………………………….

Fire-insurance premium for first year…………………………..

Reserve account for real estate taxes…………………………..

Reserve account for insurance……………………………………..

Interest on new loan from closing – to end of month……..

Document preparation fee…………………………………………..

Recording fees……………………………………………………………..

Half of escrow fee………………………………………………………..

Loan-origination fee…………………………………………………….

Homeowner association dues, if applicable…………………..

Home warranty, if applicable……………………………………….

Assumption change-of-records fees, if applicable…………

Home inspection (typically paid outside of closing)……..

[Other expense]………………………………………………………….

[Other expense]………………………………………………………….

[Other expense]………………………………………………………….

Subtotal Estimated Expenses………………………………………………………………………….

Credits (or costs paid outside of closing)

[Credit]………………………………………………………………………

[Credit]………………………………………………………………………

[Credit]………………………………………………………………………

[Credit]………………………………………………………………………

Total Credits……………………………………………………………………………………………

Estimated Cash to Bring To Closing……………………………………………………………

Who Pays for What at Closing?

The Seller can normally be expected to pay for the following:

 Real Estate Commission.

  • Owner’s title-insurance premiums.
  • Half of the escrow fee (except for VA loans, where the seller pays 100%).
  • Payoff of all loans in seller’s name.
  • Fees, re-conveyance fees, and prepayment penalties.
  • Home warranty according to the contract, if any.
  • Any judgements, tax liens, etc., against the seller.
  • Recording fees to clear all documents of record against the seller.
  • Tax pro-ration. This is for any unpaid taxes at the time of transfer of title.
  • Any unpaid homeowner-association dues.
  • Any assessments according to the contract.
  • Any and all delinquent taxes per the contract.
  • Appraisal.
  • State real estate tax fee.
  • Sales tax.
  • New approval of well, septic, and as-built survey (if required).
  • Re-inspection fee with appraiser or home inspector (as negotiated in contract).
  • Half of the document-preparation fee (unless VA or FHA loan; then the seller pays 100%).
The buyer can normally be expected to pay for the following:
  • Lender’s title-policy premium–American Land Title Association (ALTA).
  • Half of escrow fee (unless you are a verteran and getting a VA loan; then the seller pays 100%).
  • Recording charges for all documents in buyers names.
  • All new loan charges (except those required of the seller by the lender).
  • Interest on a new loan from date of funding to 30 days prior to first payment date.
  • Assumption/change-of-records fees for takeover of existing loan.
  • Home warranty according to contract.
  • Fire-insurance premium for the first year.
  • Home inspection.
  • Reserve account for taxes and insurance.
  • Flood-certification fee.
There are some mandatory costs:
  • Both FHA and VA require that the seller must pay for document preparation, tax service, warehousing, and loan-review fee (if any).
  • VA: 100% of escrow closing fee.

Understanding Title Insurance!

What is Title Insurance?

A Title Insurance Policy is a quarantee by a title company that a thorough investigation of the title to the property has been conducted and that you have been notified of any outstanding claims to the property. The title insurance company reports any defects in the title in the form of a Title Commitment so that these matters can be corrected. It is important that you know of all claims on the property and have them resolved and declared removed prior to you taking title to the property.

The Title Commitment will carefully detail what items of encumbrance are not covered by the policy. You can either get these items resolved or bow out of the transaction. Title insurance covers matters that occurred before the policy’s effective date but were discovered later. Your policy will detail what is covered, what is not covered, and the effective date.

Title insurance is issued by the title company when they are certain the property is free from all liens, encumbrances, interests, etc., and the insurance guarantees such. This is so the title can be legally transferred to the buyer to be used as security for the lender’s funds. This is why title insurance is required by the lender. Your lender has an interest in knowing that you and the lender are the only parties with claims to the property.

The title insurance company thoroughly searches the public records to uncover any unpaid taxes, mortgages, judgments against previous owners, easements, and other court actions or recorded documents that can affect title to the real estate. The insurance also provides protection against any defect in the public record such as forgery, similar names, error in the records, etc., and protest against any undiscovered or unrecorded claims that may arise in the future.

When title insurance is issued, the title insurance company accepts the responsibility for any and all claims on the property prior to your purchase if they do not find the claim or call it to your attention prior to your purchase of the property. That responsibility includes defending your title in order to perfect your title and keep you in possession of your property.

Unlike other forms of insurance, the original premium is your only cost as long as you or your heirs own the property. There are no annual payments required to keep your Owner’s Title Policy in force.

Title insurance protects you twice–it notifies you of claims against the property and insures you against any future claims on hidden items.

Important Decisions in Buying – Cain and Company Buyer’s Book

 

For more information on what Title Insurance is and what is does for you check out www.title.com !

“Need some DON’T buy that house if it has….”advice?

 

 

You don’t have to be a “do-it-yourselfer” to spot some obvious “warning signs” when looking at houses. Here are some simple tips and things to look for when house hunting! Remember that having a certified inspector take a look at the home you choose to put an offer on is vital to saving money down the road. With these tips you can rule out homes that look “nice”, but have costly issues, before you get to that point.

From the curb.

Before you enter the house, take a walk around the outside. Look at the foundation. Is the landscaping angled away from the home to control water run-off? If water is pooling near the foundation this can cause deterioration of the foundation and be a sign of leaking in the basement if the house has one. Also, notice if there are any cracks in the foundation. Large cracks and walls that appear uneven can be a warning sign of bigger problems. Take a step back to the curb and look at the roof. If there is obvious bowing or shingles appear to be coming up, the roof might need to be replaced. Also, large old trees can be nice to look at, but if they are too close to the house there is danger of roots growing into the foundation. They can also be a hazard in bad weather if they are leaning towards the house.

Once inside the house, start on the lowest floor and work your way up.

If the home has a basement or crawl space, take a look. Pooling water or mold on walls is an obvious hazard and sign of leaking. Look for cracks in foundation walls and signs of walls that are leaning. If everything appears to be solid take a look around for the electrical box and furnace. Both of these need to be in good working order and up to standards for the state you live in.  According to the FHA guidelines, electrical should be at least 60-watts, if it appears to be running the appliances that are present sufficiently. For homes with all electric, heating and appliances, 200 watt amperage is recommended. Take a look around the furnace for pipes that are broken or disconnected.

Main living area, kitchen and bathrooms.

While you’re looking around to see if you like the layout of the house, take a look at the walls and ceilings. Are there cracks that appear deeper than just the paint? Do the walls appear even and free of holes or areas that “look” repaired? In kitchen and bathrooms, check under the sinks for leakage and mold.  Look around walls near bathtub and sinks for signs of water damage and mold. Mold can be dangerous as well as pricey to get rid of. Check the pressure of the water if possible and notice if water appears to drain easily. Check for discoloration and mold around window sills and doors. Windows and doors a can both be pricey to replace.

There are a million and one things to consider and worry about when purchasing a “new” home, but with a little sleuthing and a basic idea of the most important and most expensive items to replace/repair, you can save yourself a lot of time and money! Happy hunting!

Finding obvious signs of deterioration might not be as hard as you thought!

For more information on homes click here: www.kevinduffy.com

Why Buy?

9 Reasons to Buy Versus Rent your Home!

1. Pride in Owning: Most people buy homes to have control over where they live. Although investment features are important, the psychological reasons for buying–the satisfaction of owning and freedom from paying rent–are at least as important.

In a survey done by the National Association of Realtors of 6,000 homeowners and 2,000 renters–perhaps the largest survey ever of attitudes toward home ownership–it was shown that 76% of owners and 66% of renters considered pride of ownership an important reason for buying.

2. Dislike paying Rent: Close to 7 in 10 of almost equal portions of owners and renters expressed a dislike of paying rent as an important reason to buy. Renting offers a lifestyle that’s nearly maintenance-free. That may appeal to you, but consider that renting offers you no equity, no tax benefit, and no protection against regular rent increases. Writing a rent check is just like watching your hard-earned money sail away!

3. Settling Down: More than 6 in 10 renters said “settling down” was an important reason to by.

4. Good Investment: 76% of owners and 69% of renters said that the investment aspect of ownership was important.

5. Tax Advantage: Property taxes and qualified home interests are deductible on Schedule A, for itemized deductions.

6.Long-Term Appreciation: People consider homeownership a good investment because they view it as a long-term venture. Historically, home prices have risen at relatively steady rates. Existing home prices rose an average of 4% per year between 1980 and 1992.

7. Leverage Investments: People borrow a great deal to buy homes, yet they receive the full benifits of price appreciation. In the long run, investments in homes far out pace inflation rates.

8. Source of Savings: Homeownership always has been and continues to comprise the singel largest source of savings for American households. Howeowners build equity and can borrow against it.

9. Sacrifices Are Worth It: Almost 7 in 10 renters in the National Association of Realtors homeownership survey said that they planned to buy a home in the future. More than three-quarters of these people said they were willing to sacrifice to do that.

Exciting Year In Real Estate!

The climate of the housing market and in the state of the United States economy as whole is warm. Top economists are making predictions left and right. Leaders in the Obama administration are making proposals for improving the unemployment budget deficit and creating tax reforms along with a plethora of other proposals, reforms and bills. Basically, the state of the economy is not great, but according to former treasury secretary, Paul O’Neill, “We are moving forward at a pretty gradual pace,” he said. “But I don’t think things are terrible.” CNBC Real Estate Reporter, Diana Olick is in agreeance, according to her blog on Thursday January 20, 2011, where she stated, “Today’s numbers were hands down, no argument, really good news for the housing market, but we’re not out of the woods yet.” We might be heading up hill, but not without some pushing. In another blog, Olick said that, “High inventories and lower prices will either be too much for sellers to stomach or create the kind of bargain-buying bonanza that the market needs to find its footing.” Let’s just hope that improved tax reforms will create more revenue for the average American, which will improve consumer confidence. If Obama can come through with his plans to create margin in the jobless to employed ratio, then come spring, the market will start looking much more positive.

Let’s hope for some big improvements that will yield to a very exciting year in real estate!

The Fire Drill—And Other Tips For Showing Your Home Successfully!

So, you might be a bit overwhelmed by the plethora of information available out there about selling a house; tips, tricks, and every piece of advice under the sun. To make it simpler, here is a list of “Seller Reminder Points” that are extremely simple, to the point, and helpful. They aren’t intended to be every bit of information you’ll need during the selling process, rather, they are meant to be an aid in the “showing” process.

Seller Reminder Points

1. Don’t “sell” your home. Let the agent do his/her job. The agent will show the benefits based on the Buyer’s needs, wants and perceptions.

2. “Fire Drill” time is: Opening blinds, turning on lights, turning the television off, put soft music on.

3. Agent drive bys/drop ins. Say “I’ll be happy to allow you to show the home. Can you give me 3 minutes?” Then it’s Fire Drill time!

4. Greet your Buyer and agents at the door (if you are at home) and direct them to listing information book about your home. Then please leave the home to allow the buyers to look in leisure.

5. Say “If you have any questions, I’ll be in the back/front yard” and leave the house at this time.

6. Keep track of how long the buyers are in the house. If any buyers are in the home more than 25 minutes, they may be very interested.

7. If asked an uncomfortable question, i.e. lower price, modifications the buyers may want, types of people that live in the neighborhood, etc., simply say “I think it is something my agent would be happy to talk with you about.”

8. Remember “real” buyers want to touch, smell and explore. Have your kitchen drawers, closets and garage organized.

9. Never apologize for the present condition of the home. If it is unclean, or toys are out, don’t mention why.

10. Most agents may not arrive on time when showing property. Many will be ahead of or behind schedule, or may not even show up at all.

“The Fire Drill”, along with these other reminders, is a great plan to have in place in order to be ready to open your door to prospective buyers with only a few minute’s notice and still Wow them from their first step inside!